Statistics

INDEX

Kansas 

Kansas and National

STATISTICS

KANSAS

Sexual and Domestic Violence Program Service Numbers in One Year (2017)

  • 59,086 Victims served
  • 16,880 Face-to-face services (not shelter services)
  • 39,367 Crisis hotline calls
  • 189,442 Hours of services by program staff  
  • 3,234 Victims found refuge in safe shelters
  • 115,978 Shelter bed nights
  • 3,332 Volunteers 
  • 78,234 Hours of volunteer service
  • 5,565 Training and community awareness presentations 

(Services provided in 2017 by 25 of 27 (which is 93 percent of) KCSDV coalition member programs. See the KCSDV 2017 Kansas statewide services fact sheet PDF document.) 

See the full Kansas Statewide Data Initiative Report as a PDF document

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Domestic Violence Program Service Numbers in One Day (2017)

  • 881 Victims served 
  • 453 Victims found refuge in emergency shelters or transitional housing
  • 428 Adults and children received non-residential assistance and services, including counseling, legal advocacy, and children’s support groups
  • 240 Hotline calls answered 
  • 221 Unmet requests for services (Of those unmet requests, 71 percent were for housing. Emergency shelter and transitional housing continue to be the most urgent unmet needs with 117 requests unmet)
  • 13 Staff or staff positions at five local programs in Kansas were laid off or were not filled (Half were direct services positions) 

(See the NNEDV 12th Annual Domestic Violence Counts Kansas Summary PDF document, which shows 24 out of 24 (which is 100 percent of) KCSDV coalition member programs that are domestic violence victim advocacy services programs across the state of Kansas. This data was recorded by each program on September 13, 2017 and reflects services provided during the 24-hour survey period.)

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Sexual Violence Program Service Numbers in One Week (2017)

  • 59,086 Victims served 
  • 16,880 Face-to-face services provided  
  • 39,367 Crisis hotline calls 
  • 189,442 Hours of services provided 
  • 115,978 Shelter bed nights provided 

(See the full KCSDV Sexual Violence (SV) Census PDF document, which reflects sexual violence, victim advocacy services provided by 27 out of 27 (100 percent) KCSDV coalition member programs across the state of Kansas. This data was recorded by each program on September 11-17, 2017 and reflects services provided during the seven-day, week-long survey period.)

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KANSAS AND NATIONAL

 

Children

  • 12.3 percent of women and 27.8 percent of men were 10 years old or younger at the time of their first completed rape (NSVRC, 2011)

  • Only 12 percent of child sexual abuse is ever reported to the authorities (NSVRC, 2011)

  • In 2009, about a third of victims identified in internet sexual offense cases were children (NSVRC, 2011)

  • Each year, more than 2 million children are exploited in the global commercial sex trade, many of them in prostitution (Futures Without Violence, 2008) 
  • Children born to abused mothers are 17 percent more likely to be born underweight and 30 percent more likely than other children to require intensive care upon birth (Futures Without Violence, 2008
  • 34 percent of people who sexually abuse children are family members (NSVRC, 2011)
  • In a single day in 2007, 13,485 children were living in a domestic violence shelter or transitional housing facility (Futures Without Violence, 2008)
Learn more about child and youth advocacy in Kansassexual violence, and domestic violence. For journalists, see the Suggested Practices for Journalists Reporting on Child Abuse and Neglect PDF document by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

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Domestic Violence (Intimate Partner Violence)

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Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) (Domestic Violence)

  • In 2007, 10.1 percent of adult females in Kansas reported domestic violence victimization (Domestic Violence Victim Services: Awareness, Use and Satisfaction Project Report, 2007) 
  • IPV remains a public health issue of significant importance, affecting many women and men in the United States (The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)2010
    • Specifically, with regard to women’s lifetime experience of violence by an intimate partner: 
      • Nearly 1 in 10 has been raped
      • Approximately 1 in 6 has experienced sexual violence other than rape 
      • Approximately 1 in 4 has experienced severe physical violence 
      • Nearly 1 in 3 has been slapped, pushed, or shoved 
      • More than 1 in 10 has been stalked
      • Nearly 1 in 2 has experienced psychological aggression
    • With regard to men’s lifetime experience of violence by an intimate partner: 
      • Approximately 1 in 12 has experienced sexual violence other than rape 
      • Nearly 1 in 7 has experienced severe physical violence 
      • 1 in 4 has been slapped, pushed or shoved
      • Nearly 1 in 48 has been stalked
      • Nearly 1 in 2 has experienced psychological aggression
  • A significant proportion of IPV victims experience negative impacts as a result of IPV victimization (NISVS, 2010)
    • Although no demographic group is immune to these forms of violence, consistent patterns emerged with respect to the subpopulations in the United States that are most heavily affected
  • Sexual violence by an intimate partner (NISVS, 2010)
    • Nearly 1 in 10 women in the United States (9.4%) has been raped by an intimate partner in her lifetime, including completed forced penetration, attempted forced penetration, or alcohol/drug facilitated completed penetration
    • Approximately 1 in 45 men (2.2%) has been made to penetrate an intimate partner during his lifetime
    • An estimated 16.9% of women and 8.0% of men have experienced sexual violence other than rape (being made to penetrate an intimate partner, sexual coercion, unwanted sexual contact, and non-contact unwanted sexual experiences) by an intimate partner in their lifetime
  • Physical violence by an intimate partner (NISVS, 2010)                                
    • Women and men experienced many types of physical violence ranging from being slapped to having a knife or gun used against them
    • An estimated 36.2 million women have been slapped, pushed or shoved by an intimate partner at some point in her lives
    • Women had a significantly higher lifetime prevalence of severe physical violence by an intimate partner (24.3%) compared to men (13.8%)
    • Approximately 2.7% of women and 2.0% of men experienced severe physical violence in the 12 months preceding the survey
  • Stalking by an intimate partner (NISVS, 2010)
    • Women had a significantly higher lifetime prevalence of stalking by an intimate partner (10.7%) compared to men (2.1%)
    • Women had a significantly higher 12-month prevalence of stalking by an intimate partner (2.8%) compared to men (0.5%)
  • Psychological aggression by an intimate partner (NISVS, 2010)
    • Nearly half of U.S. women (48.4%) and half of U.S. men (48.8%) have experienced at least one psychologically aggressive behavior by an intimate partner during their lifetime
    • Men had a significantly higher prevalence of experiencing psychological aggression from an intimate partner in the 12 months preceding the survey than women (18.1% and 13.9%, respectively)
  • Overlap of rape, physical violence, and stalking (NISVS, 2010)
    • Among those who experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, male victims (92.1%) were significantly more likely than female victims (56.8%) to experience physical violence only
    • Among male victims, 6.3% experienced both physical violence and stalking in their lifetime; too few men reported other combinations of rape, physical violence, and stalking to produce reliable estimates
    • Among female victims, 14.4% experienced physical violence and stalking; 8.7% experienced both rape and physical violence; 12.5% experienced rape, physical violence, and stalking
  • Impact of Violence by an Intimate Partner (NISVS, 2010)
    • Women were significantly more likely than men to experience rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner and report at least one impact related to experiencing these or other forms of violent behavior in the relationship (e.g., psychological aggression, being made to penetrate someone else, sexual coercion)
    • Female victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking were significantly more likely than male victims to experience each of the IPV-related impacts measured including fear, concern for safety, need for medical care, injury, need for housing services, and having missed at least one day of work or school
  • IPV reported by women is typically more severe and results in a greater number of negative impacts than IPV victimization reported by men (NISVS, 2010)
    • Specifically, during their lifetime, women were more likely than men to experience: severe physical violence; sexual violence other than rape by an intimate partner; stalking by an intimate partner; and expressive aggression
    • Women are more likely than men to experience: multiple forms of intimate partner violence (including rape, physical violence, and stalking), both across the life span and within individual violent relationships; a need for services in general; and at least one of the negative IPV-related impacts that were measured, including injury and having missed at least one day of work or school
  • Survivors are 4 times more likely to use an intervention after talking with a health care professional about abuse. (Futures Without Violence, 2017)

  • 81 percent of intimate partner victims report significant long-term impacts of abuse including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms and physical injuries (NISVS, 2010)
  • In 2010, it was estimated that 168,000 women living in Kansas had been raped at some point in their lifetime (NISVS, 2010)
  • Kansas sexual and domestic violence program services in a year 
  • Kansas domestic violence program services in a day
  • Kansas sexual violence program services in a week
  • Teen Dating Violence

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Reproductive Coercion

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Sexual Violence

  • Prevalence

    • Nearly 1 in 5 women have been raped in their lifetimes (NSVRC, 2011)

    • On average, almost 500 women (483) are raped or sexually assaulted each day in the United States (Futures Without Violence, 2008)
  • Relationship to the victim 
    • Approximately 78.5 percent of 2012 Kansas rape offenders were known by their victims (KBI, 2012)
    • Nearly 1 in 2 female victims of sexual violence reported perpetration by an acquaintance (NISVS, 2010)
    • 52.4 percent of male victims report being raped by an acquaintance (NSVRC, 2011)
  • Perpatrators and rapists
    • Male rape victims and male victims of non-contact unwanted sexual experiences reported predominantly male perpetrators (NISVS, 2010)
    • 98.1 percent of female rape victims reported only male perpetrators (NISVS, 2010)
  • Each rape costs approximately $151,423. (NSVRC, 2011)
  • Sexual violence in Kansas
  • Reproductive Coercion
  • Teen Dating Violence
Learn more about sexual violence and domestic violence

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Stalking

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Teen Dating Violence

  • Among adult victims of rape, physical violence, and stalking by an intimate partner, 22.4 percent of women and 15.0 percent of men first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age (NISVS, 2011)

  • 41 percent of female child sexual violence victims did not complete high school (PCAR, 2007) 
  • 1 in 3 adolescents tested for sexually transmitted infections and HIV have experienced domestic violence (Futures Without Violence, 2008)
  • 35.2 percent of women who reported a completed rape before age 18 also experienced a completed rape as an adult (NISVS, 2010)
  • Nearly 10 percent of high school students report being hit, slapped, or physically hurt by their boyfriend or girlfriend. (CDC, 2011)

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Violence Against People With Disabilities

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Violence and Immigrant Women

  • In one study, 62 percent of immigrant women reported that they were subjected to weekly physical and emotional abuse (Ayuda, 2011)
  • 1 in 5 female immigrant victims reported that their spouses use threats of deportation, of not filing immigration papers, or withdrawing papers as a power and control tactic in their relationship (Ayuda, 2011)
  • Immigrant women report exceptionally high rates of sexual assault during their first two years in the U.S. (JWI, 2010)
  • When their spouse is a U.S. citizen, abuse rates rise to 59.5 percent for immigrant women (JWI, 2010)
  • 18 percent of the U.S. population is immigrant or foreign-born, but less than 1 percent of reported sexual assaults are against foreign-born women (National Violence Against Women Survey)

Learn more about sexual violence and domestic violence

Violence and Poverty

  • 45 percent of domestic violence survivors in one study reported experiencing financial difficulties including not being able to pay their bills (NCRDV, 2010)
  • 13 percent of homeless adults in the cities surveyed by the U.S. Conference of Mayors were victims of domestic violence (A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in American Cities, 2011)
  • In a 2008, 99 percent of domestic violence victims surveyed had experienced at least one form of economic abuse (VAWnet, 2008)
  • 92 percent of a sample of homeless mothers had experienced severe physical and/or sexual violence at some point in their lives (PCAR, 2007) 
  • Studies of welfare caseloads find that as much as 23 percent of women receiving public assistance are current or past victims of domestic violence (VAWnet, 2001)
  • 27.5 percent of "street youth" and 9.5 percent of "shelter youth" engaged in survival sex (which is the term for when someone has sex in exchange for food, drugs, or money) (PCAR, 2007) 
  • 50 percent sexual assault victims lost their jobs or were forced to quit after being raped (PCAR, 2007) 
Learn more about sexual violence and domestic violence

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Still have questions? Contact KCSDV.

Updated 7/12/2018

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